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Additional Resources

October Newsletter: Keep Your Cart Local

Keep Your Cart Local

The push to support local business has come to the attention of many over the last few years. We have seen some great spark to this movement with the Shop Small development of “Small Business Saturday” to follow up the mostly corporate hype of Black Friday. The typical motivation is to help keep your dollar local and keep your economy flourishing and vibrant. This is by all means reason enough alone to support local businesses, but in the pursuit of sustainability we often forget the HUGE footprint that we help avoid by shopping local as well. The chain of events that has to take place to receive that package in two days comes with a hidden cost. This cost is not only to our local economy, but to our environment.

My piece last month about embodied energy touched briefly on the benefits of reusing a material over purchasing new with a big portion of reason coming from transportation, logistics, and packaging. As our country has continued to develop many businesses have specialized and centralized, appealing to our connivance and budget. In the wake, many mom and pop shops and our environment paid the price. The good news, we can vote with our dollar to support the local artisans, farmers, and makers to keep our footprints low and our city strong. The Waste Equals network helps in both categories by connecting businesses and their materials. In doing so, we keep these materials local and keep them out of the landfill. We are not alone, we are a part of a larger collection of organizations helping Boise continue on it’s path to ultimate livability.

Other’s Tracking In The Right Direction

City of Boise Business Waste Challenge

Idaho Power’s Clean Energy Pledge

The Opening of Roots Zero Waste Market

Product Highlight

Earlier this year we worked with a lumber mill in Payette to help salvage some of their inventory trapped in their warehouse after their roof collapsed under a heavy snow load. These slabs are all we have left and we would love to incorporate them into a project. There are some unique pieces that you can’t find at Home Depot for prices you can’t find their either. We are selling the pieces for $1 per board foot. A board foot is one inch thick x 12 inches x 12 inches. Its a way to measure wood that is all different thicknesses and lengths.

Earlier this year we worked with a lumber mill in Payette to help salvage some of their inventory trapped in their warehouse after their roof collapsed under a heavy snow load. These slabs are all we have left and we would love to incorporate them into a project. There are some unique pieces that you can’t find at Home Depot for prices you can’t find their either. We are selling the pieces for $1 per board foot. A board foot is one inch thick x 12 inches x 12 inches. Its a way to measure wood that is all different thicknesses and lengths.
We have about 850 board feet of this lumber. Our thickest piece is 4 inches and the largest width is about 12 inches. Most boards are long, about 14 to 20 feet, but can be cut down to size for your project. We’ve had some customers pick this up for wood working, for restoration projects, and other rustic style projects. It is all pine with a rough sawn face and some live edges. Pass along to a friend you think might be interested for call us if you want to come take a look.

Thanks for reading, enjoy your day.


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